Wearables

Dayzz announces integration with Garmin wearables to improve sleep and performance of athletes

Image: dayzz

A lack of sleep not only makes you cranky but over time, skimping sleep can impact your health negatively. Studies have shown that for good health, a good night’s sleep is just as important as eating healthy and exercising. Tel Aviv, Israel-based innovative corporate sleep solution provider dayzz has integrated with Garmin wearables to provide personalized sleep training plans based on users’ own sleep data, helping improve overall quantity and quality of sleep.

With this integration, Garmin users will receive actionable recommendations to improve their sleep. To stay in physical and mental condition, runners also need quality sleep. Runners’ sleep data will automatically sync with the dayzz app, updating their personal in-app sleep tracker with information such as what time they went to bed, how long it took them to fall asleep, how many times they woke up throughout the night and other factors that affect their sleep. The sleep tracker will instinctively update every day based on the previous night, which will save users time and mitigate possible inaccuracies due to human error, says a press release.

“We are excited to be working with Garmin, and believe that this integration is an important step forward in providing value to the market, targeting runners and athletes,” said Amir Inditzky, CEO of dayzz. “Sleep is a core pillar of health, affecting almost every tissue in our systems. While we sleep, our body renews and resets in order to function properly the next day. This is especially important for athletes to repair and restore their muscles. Garmin users will receive personalized guidance based on their sleep data in order to improve their performance through healthy sleep routines.”

Source: www.wearable-technologies.com

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